African Medical and Research Case Study
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African Medical and Research Case Study
Option #1: African Medical and Research Foundation Case Study Review
In this assignment, you will review the case study on AMREF found in Chapter 4 of your textbook ( I HAVE INCLUDED THE CASE STUDY AT THE END OF THE SUBMISSION), the first case study in the section “Involving Communities in Their Health.”
In approximately two pages, your paper should address the following:
1. What elements of broad strategic thinking do you see demonstrated?
2. What aspects of social development are addressed?
3. What evidence of healthy public policy do you see?
4. Do you see evidence of systems development for health or social policy and related programming?
5. What information stood out most to you from this case study that you might be able to apply in your local community?
Instructions:
· Write a 2- to 3-page paper of about 1,500 words, not including the title and reference pages, which are required.
· The paper must be formatted correctly using APA style. Remember, all research material used in your paper must be paraphrased and include an in-text citation.
· Your paper must be properly cited and formatted according to the CSU-Global Guide to Writing and APA Requirements.
· This is an individual paper; however, you should reflect on our Discussion Forums and incorporate ideas from there, as appropriate.
African Medical and Research Case Study
· Be sure you utilize your text appropriately as a reference and cite at least one other credible external reference such as a website or journal article to support your proposed resolution of the case.
· Your external sources can be trade publications, government information, newspaper articles, or scholarly or peer-reviewed journal articles journal articles. The CSU-Global Library is a good place to find these sources.
· Turn the paper in via the Submissions Folder.
Chapter 4 case study
The Work of AMREF with the Masaai: Our first story is of the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF): in 1957, three men of vision launched the Flying Doctor Service in Kenya. From this emerged the African Medical and Research Foundation, Africa’s largest indigenous health NGO. While their first two decades focused on service delivery, AMREF came to realize that episodic clinical visits were neither effective nor efficient, and that community-based approaches were vital. AMREF’s Mission today reflects this recognition: “ . . . In creating vibrant networks of informed communities that work with empowered health workers in stronger health systems, we aim to ensure every African has access to the good health which is theirs by right” 32
AMREF evolved from those beginnings to become a health systems development agency for many countries. Its operations reflect disease burdens at the grassroots: malaria, HIV, school health, water, sanitation and hygiene. Its success in promoting primary health care builds on partnerships. It finds ways to improve people’s health by examining the determinants: environment, culture, economics, micro-financing, politics, leadership and other ingredients. Supported by operational research, many AMREF initiatives become health systems models for Africa, influencing poli- cies and practices across the continent. AMREF is committed to evidence-based community health: an example for the world.
Moving from its origins to an example of AMREF in action: Kenya’s plains offer little water and swarms of flies, and trachoma persists among the Masaai. In tradi- tional culture, each wife shares a one-room home with her children and newborn animals, preparing meals on a contaminated floor. To tackle this leading infectious cause of blindness, AMREF applies WHO’s “SAFE” protocol: Surgery to treat end-stage disease, Antibiotics to reduce the reservoir of infection, Facial cleanliness and Environmental improvements, for example: “leaky tin technology” (a tin-can with a hole plugged by a thorn allows clean water to remain uncontaminated and used sparingly) to reduce transmission.
A recent report on AMREF’s work in the Rift Valley reveals that the SAFE pro- tocol reduced active disease within 3 years in children from 47% to 16.0%, while potentially blinding trachoma declined 4.5% to 1.7%. The proportion of faces with many flies fell over 4 years from 48% to 6%.33 The strategy is sustainable and has advanced eye care policy globally, boding well for WHO’s goal of elimination by 2020 (GET 2020).34 You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.
Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.
Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.
The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.
 
 
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