Critical appraisal of non-communicable disease aetiology

 

Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases (401174)

 

ASSIGNMENT 1

 

Autumn, 2016

 

Assessment Topix : Critical appraisal of non-communicable disease aetiology

(20%)

This assignment is based on the learning objectives and concepts as described in the Unit Learning Guide. There are a total of 100 marks and this assignment will contribute 20% towards the total assessment for this subject. The marking matrix that will be used for this assignment is also attached.

 

This assignment is limited to 2 pages. See specific instructions below relating to the page formatting of Assignment 1. Assignments that do not comply with these specifications will not be marked.

 

Your assignment should be typed, with adequate space left between questions. Assignments should be submitted via vUWS. Be as concise as possible in your answers, and use the number of marks allocated to each question as a guide for how much to write.

 

Please note this is an individual exercise.

 

 

Late assignments will not be accepted without prior approval.

 

 

 

 

Select a peer-reviewed journal article that illustrates the critical period model, sensitive period model, or accumulation of risk model for an association between an exposure and a non-communicable disease outcome. Complete the following questions based on the article you select.

 

Question 1:  Provide the reference of the article and indicate the following: (a) the life-course model illustrated, and the period in the life-course to which the exposure relates, (b) summarise the hypothesised aetiological mechanism by which the exposure is associated with the outcome, and (c) summarise the findings of the example article you selected. [30 marks]

 

Question 2: Summarise the evidence-base that supports (or does not support) the association in the article you selected [30 marks]

 

Consider the following elements for this question:

-How many studies of the association?

-What type of studies? Based on what samples, or population-bases?

-Are findings across these studies consistent and coherent, particularly from studies of similar or more powerful study designs?

-Are the results plausible in terms of a biological mechanism?

 

Question 3: Summarise the key methodological limitations in interpreting the association described in Question 1, and assess the extent to which the observed association can be attributed to non-causal mechanisms. [40 marks]

 

Consider the following elements for this question:

-Is there a temporal relationship between exposure and outcome?

-Is there a strong relationship between the exposure and the outcome?

-Is there a dose-response relationship between exposure and the outcome?

-Is the outcome measure affected by selection and/or measurement bias?

-Is the exposure measure affected by selection and/or measurement bias?

-Are the results likely to be affected by confounding?

-Are the results likely to be affected by chance variation?

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT 1: ASSIGNMENT FORMATTING

 

This assignment is limited to 2 pages based on the formatting below. As indicated above, there are page limits for this Assignment. Please note, this does not include a reference list, which can be appended separately to your final document.

 

Please ensure that your assignment complies with the following formatting specifications. Assignments that do not comply with these specifications will not be marked.

 

Format:                       A single Word document file

 

Page Limits:                As indicated for each question (see questions above)

 

Paper Size:                  Standard A4 (210 x 297mm)

 

Margins:                     All margins at least 2.0cm.

 

Font                             At least 12 point and Times New Roman only

 

Line spacing:              Must be set to single or greater.

 

Character spacing:     Spacing must be set to normal. Scale must be set to 100%.

 

Web Links:                 Links to additional information on any website must not be                                             included in your assignment

 

Graphics:                    Graphics (pictures, diagrams etc) may be included in the                                                response if contained within the page limits provided.

 

Tables:                        Tabulated information may be included if contained within the                            page limits provided.

 

References:                Harvard or Vancouver style. Attach references as a separate                             page at the end of your Assignment. Reference list is not                                        included within page limits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENT 1: ASSIGNMENT MARKING MATRIX

 

Marking criteria for Assignment 1

  Not for dissemination Not publishable, but could be an internal report Publishable with substantial revisions after re-review Publishable with some significant revisions Publishable after minor revisions
Criteria F (0-49) P (50-64) C (65-74) D (75-84) HD (85-100)
30% Article summary Poor summary of article findings, with findings and the relevant life-course model over looked or ignored. Little demonstrated attempt to describe the putative aetiological mechanism illustrated in the article. Some of the article findings are presented. Some elements of the selected life-course model presented. Putative aetiological mechanism described. Summary of article findings presented, and exposition of the selected life-course model provided, including the putative aetiological mechanism illustrated in the article. Comprehensive summary of article findings, and detailed exposition of the selected life-course model, and of the putative aetiological mechanism illustrated in the article. Comprehensive summary of article findings, and extensive and relevant exposition of the selected life-course model, and of the putative aetiological mechanism illustrated in the article.
30% Summary of evidence Little relevant evidence presented.Discussion of evidence is descriptive; there is little attempt, if any to integrate and interpret information. Little demonstrated attempt to identify strengths and weaknesses. Some relevant evidence presented. Discussion of evidence is descriptive. There is some attempt to identify strengths and weaknesses, based on interpreted information  Some relevant evidence presented. Interpretation of evidence is analytical (rather than descriptive). Appropriate integration of evidence and interpretation of strengths and weaknesses Detailed and relevant evidence presented. Analytical and accurate synthesis and analysis of strengths and weaknesses of the literature, with strong evidence base to support study objectives Extensive and relevant evidence presented. Strong synthesis and critical analysis of strengths and weaknesses of the literature demonstrated, with excellent evidence base to support study objectives 
40%Methodological limitations Little relevant critique of methodological limitations presented. Critique is descriptive, and there is little attempt, if any, to incorporate elements of  temporality, strength of association, dose-response, and bias and confounding. Some relevant critique of methodological limitations presented. Critique is descriptive. There is some attempt to incorporate elements of  temporality, strength of association, dose-response, and bias and confounding. Some relevant critique of methodological limitations presented. Critique is analytical (rather than descriptive), and incorporates some elements of  temporality, strength of association, dose-response, and bias and confounding. Detailed and relevant critique of methodological limitations of article, incorporating elements of temporality, strength of association, dose-response, and bias and confounding. Extensive and relevant  critique of methodological limitations of article,  incorporating elements of temporality, strength of association, dose-response, and bias and confounding.
 Mark out of 100:  Mark out of 20:
Comments: 

 

 

 

 

401174 Au Epidem tum iolog n 2 y of N 016 on-Commun School o icable f Medicine e Disea e│Learning ses Guide UNIT DETAILS Unit Code: 401174 Unit Name: Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases Level: 7 Contact hours per week: Lecture: 1 hour Tutorial: 2 hour Credit Points 10 Assumed Knowledge: It is assumed that students have an introductory level of epidemiology and biostatistics. Co-requisites for this course are 401076 ‘Introduction to Epidemiology’ and 401077 ‘Introduction to Biostatistics’ STAFF Unit Coordinator and point of first contact Professor Andrew Page Building: 3, Campbelltown campus Phone: 4620 3829 Email: a.page@westernsydney.edu.au CONSULTATION ARRANGEMENTS Campbelltown/ Parramatta Campus Staff: Prof. Andrew Page. Date/Time: Please email to arrange a time Venue: Campbelltown/Parramatta Textbook Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010 Edition: «Session» «Year» © Copyright: Western Sydney University, September 2015. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission from the Dean of the School of Science & Health. Copyright for acknowledged materials reproduced herein is retained by the copyright holder. All readings in this publication are copied under licence in accordance with Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968. Table of Contents Table of Contents 1 1. About «Unit_Name» 1 1.1 An Introduction to this Unit 1 1.2 What is Expected of You 1 2. Learning and Teaching in this Unit 2 2.1 Unit Learning Outcomes 2 2.2 Course Learning Outcomes or Graduate Attributes 2 2.3 Schedule of Activities 4 2.4 Summary of How Learning Activities Support Achievement of Unit Learning Outcomes 8 2.5 Learning Resources 8 3. Assessment 11 3.1 Assessment summary 11 3.2 Assessment Details 12 Assessment 1: Critical appraisal of  non‐communicable disease aetiology (20%) 12 Assessment 2: Critical appraisal of non‐communicable disease interventions (20%) 13 Assessment 3: Research protocol design (60%) 14 Assignment Cover Sheet 15 TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE WESTERN SYDNEY UNIVERSITY LEARNING GUIDE COMPANION AND WESTERN SYDNEY UNIVERSITY POLICIES. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION ONE Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 1 1. About «Unit_Name» 1.1 An Introduction to this Unit This unit will document the fundamental concepts in epidemiology and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), common research methods used in NCD epidemiology, and unique applications of these methods in key NCD areas, including reproductive epidemiology, behavioural epidemiology, epidemiology of ageing and epidemiology of specific NCDs (including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal problems and mental health problems). The principal goals of this unit are to provide a broad overview of the field, and to develop the knowledge and skills needed to (i) critically evaluate published research in NCD epidemiology and (ii) design an epidemiological study to address an NCD topic. 1.2 What is Expected of You Study Load For a 10 credit point unit, you are expected to study 10 hours per week for 14 weeks on that unit. For example, if class time totals 2 hours per week, then you are expected to study a further 8 hours per week outside of class time. Attendance It is strongly recommended that you attend all scheduled learning activities to support your learning. Lecture and tutorial attendance is not compulsory for this unit, however it is strongly recommended that students participate in these learning activities as they relate to directly to the material in unit assignments. Online Learning Requirements Unit materials will be made available on the unit’s vUWS (E-Learning) site. You are expected to consult vUWS regularly, as all unit announcements will be made via vUWS. Teaching and learning materials will be regularly updated and posted online. Special Requirements for the Unit No special requirements «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO 2. Learning and Teaching in this Unit 2.1 Unit Learning Outcomes Upon successfully completing this unit, you should be able to: 1 Describe the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and how this varies among population subgroups and countries 2 Explain the conceptual basis for a life-course approach to NCDs 3 Identify social, environmental, behavioural and biological risk factors for NCDs 4 Discuss approaches to the prevention and control of NCDs 5 Identify unique issues in the epidemiology of specific NCDs 6 Review and critically evaluate epidemiological studies of NCDs 7 Formulate research questions in the epidemiology and control of NCDs and identify suitable methods for investigating these 8 Design an epidemiological study to address an NCD topic 2.2 Course Learning Outcomes or Graduate Attributes As a graduate from the Master of Epidemiology you will have achieved the following course learning outcomes upon completion of the award: 1 Calculate and interpret measures of morbidity and mortality, and measures of association (including relative and attributable risk). 2 Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the main types of epidemiological study design 3 Describe the principle models of causation in epidemiology. 4 Discuss the epidemiologic rationale underlying population and individual disease prevention strategies. 5 Apply causal criteria in appraising epidemiological evidence. 6 Compare and contrast conceptual approaches to the conduct, design and analysis of epidemiological studies. 7 Select appropriate statistical analyses to address a given research question and, using appropriate information security standards, carry out analyses in statistical software and be able to read data into R, SAS or Stata packages. 8 Identify patterns of communicable and non-communicable diseases, and other health risks, and describe how this varies among population subgroups and countries. 9 Identify unique issues in the epidemiology of specific communicable and non-communicable diseases. 10 Apply key concepts and competencies associated with epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, and/or applied research and evidenced based practice to design and conduct a research-based project or piece of scholarship. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO As a graduate from The University, you should be able to demonstrate all of the subsets of the major attributes which are: 1 Command multiple skills and literacies to enable adaptable lifelong learning; 2 Demonstrate knowledge of Indigenous Australia through cultural competency and professional capacity; 3 Demonstrate comprehensive, coherent and connected knowledge 4 Apply knowledge through intellectual inquiry in professional or applied contexts 5 Bring knowledge to life through responsible engagement and appreciation of diversity in an evolving world «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO 2.3 Schedule of Activities Wk Lecture Tutorial Independent Reading & Activities Assessments Assessment items Feedback [Mode] 1 22/2 Topic 1: Emergence of noncommunicable disease and conceptual models Tutorial exercises: Introduction. ! Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 1: Current issues and challenges in chronic disease control. Ben-Shlomo Y, Kuh D. A life course approach to chronic disease epidemiology: conceptual models, empirical challenges and interdisciplinary perspectives. International Journal of Epidemiology. 2002;31(2):285-93. Omran AR. The epidemiologic transition: a theory of the epidemiology of population change. The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly. 1971:509-38. Additional reading Alleyne G, Binagwaho A, Haines A, Jahan S, Nugent R, Rojhani A, et al. Embedding non-communicable diseases in the post-2015 development agenda. The Lancet. 2013;381(9866):566-74. Atun R, Jaffar S, Nishtar S, Knaul FM, Barreto ML, Nyirenda M, et al. Improving responsiveness of health systems to non-communicable diseases. The Lancet. 2013;381(9867):690-7. Lynch J, Smith GD. A life course approach to chronic disease epidemiology. Annu Rev Public Health. 2005;26:1-35. Miranda J, Kinra S, Casas J, Davey Smith G, Ebrahim S. Non‐ communicable diseases in low‐and middle‐income countries: context, determinants and health policy. Tropical Medicine & International Health. 2008;13(10):1225-34. Moodie R, Stuckler D, Monteiro C, Sheron N, Neal B, Thamarangsi T, et al. Profits and pandemics: prevention of harmful effects of tobacco, alcohol, and ultra-processed food and drink industries. The Lancet. 2013;381(9867):670-9. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Wk Lecture Tutorial Independent Reading & Activities Assessments Assessment items Feedback [Mode] 2 29/2 Topic 2: Methods in chronic disease epidemiology Tutorial exercises: Topic 1 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 2: Methods in chronic disease epidemiology. Additional reading Khan KS, Kunz R, Kleijnen J, Antes G. Five steps to conducting a systematic review. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 2003;96(3):118-21. Webb, P. and Bain, C. Essential epidemiology: An introduction for students and health professionals, 2nd Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Chapter 11: Assembling the building blocks: reviews and their uses 3 7/3 Topic 3: Intervention methods and surveillance of noncommunicable disease Tutorial exercises: Topic 2 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 3: Intervention methods for chronic disease control Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 4: Chronic disease surveillance Additional reading Rose G. Strategy of prevention: lessons from cardiovascular disease. British Medical Journal. 1981;282(6279):1847-51. Sanson-Fisher RW, D’Este CA, Carey ML, Noble N, Paul CL. Evaluation of systems-oriented public health interventions: alternative research designs. Annual Review of Public Health. 2014;35:9-27. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Wk Lecture Tutorial Independent Reading & Activities Assessments Assessment items Feedback [Mode] 4 14/3 Topic 4: Risk factors for noncommunicable disease – Part I Tutorial exercises: Topic 3 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 5: Tobacco use Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 6: Diet and nutrition Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 7: Physical activity 5 21/3 Topic 5: Risk factors for noncommunicable disease – Part I [Good Friday public holiday] Tutorial exercises: Topic 4 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 8: Alcohol use Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 11: High blood pressure Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 12: High blood cholesterol Assignment 1 Online 6 28/3 [Easter Monday public holiday] No tutorial Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 9: Obesity and overweight. 7 4/4 Topic 6: Major chronic conditions: Obesity and overweight Topic 7: Major chronic conditions: Diabetes Tutorial exercises: Topic 5 Tutorial exercises: Topic 6 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 10: Diabetes 8 11/4 [Intra-session break] No tutorial . 9 18/4 Topic 8: Major chronic diseases: cardio-vascular disease Tutorial exercises: Topic 7 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 13: Cardiovascular disease Assignment 2 Online «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Wk Lecture Tutorial Independent Reading & Activities Assessments Assessment items Feedback [Mode] 10 25/4 Topic 9: Major chronic diseases: cancer Tutorial exercises: Topic 8 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 14: Cancer. 11 2/5 Topic 10: Major chronic diseases: Chronic respiratory diseases Tutorial exercises: Topic 9 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 15: Chronic respiratory diseases 12 9/5 Topic 11: Major chronic diseases: Injury Tutorial exercises: Topic 10 Required reading Hosking J, Ameratunga S, Morton S, Blank D. A life course approach to injury prevention: BMC Public Health. 2011;11(1):695. Additional reading Henley G, Harrison JE. Trends in injury deaths, Australia: 1999–00 to 2009–10. Injury research and statistics series no. 74. Cat. no. INJCAT 150. . Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; 2015. Pointer S. Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia: 1999–00 to 2012–13. Injury research and statistics series no. 95. Cat. no. INJCAT 171. . Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; 2015. Runyan CW. Introduction: back to the future—revisiting Haddon’s conceptualization of injury epidemiology and prevention. Epidemiologic Reviews. 2003;25(1):60-4. 13 16/5 Topic 12: Major chronic diseases: Mental disorders Tutorial exercises: Topic 11 Required reading Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. Chapter 16: Mental disorders. 14 23/5 Topic 13: Summary and future challenges Tutorial exercises: Topic 12 Assignment 3 Online «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 8 2.4 Summary of How Learning Activities Support Achievement of Unit Learning Outcomes UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES LEARNING ACTIVITIES ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES 1 Describe the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and how this varies among population subgroups and countries Topic 1 & Topics 5-12: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 1 2 Explain the conceptual basis for a lifecourse approach to NCDs Topic 1, & 2: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 1 3 Identify social, environmental, behavioural and biological risk factors for NCDs Topic 1 &2 : Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 1 4 Discuss approaches to the prevention and control of NCDs Topics 3 & 4 : Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 2 5 Identify unique issues in the epidemiology of specific NCDs Topics 5-12: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 2 6 Review and critically evaluate epidemiological studies of NCDs Topics 2 &3: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 1 & 2 7 Formulate research questions in the epidemiology and control of NCDs and identify suitable methods for investigating these Topics 2 &3: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 3 8 Design an epidemiological study to address an NCD topic Topics 2 &3: Lecture, tutorial, online discussion Assignment 3 2.5 Learning Resources Resources How to Engage with the Resources Lectures/ Textbooks/ Reading Lis Read the recommended chapters and lecture notes relevant to the topics. Ensure the theory match your assumptions. Summarise the contents of each topic and incorporate material from lectures and tutorials. Text book: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV (eds.) Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010 Reading List: Ainsworth BE, Macera CA. Chapter 7: Physical activity. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 199-228. Alleyne G, Binagwaho A, Haines A, Jahan S, Nugent R, Rojhani A, et al. Embedding noncommunicable diseases in the post-2015 development agenda. The Lancet. 2013;381(9866):566- 74. Alwan A, MacLean DR, Riley LM, d’Espaignet ET, Mathers CD, Stevens GA, et al. Monitoring and surveillance of chronic non-communicable diseases: progress and capacity in high-burden countries. The Lancet. 2010;376(9755):1861-8. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 9 Anderson HA, Werner M. Chapter 15: Chronic respiratory diseases. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 469-512. Atun R, Jaffar S, Nishtar S, Knaul FM, Barreto ML, Nyirenda M, et al. Improving responsiveness of health systems to non-communicable diseases. The Lancet. 2013;381(9867):690-7. Bautista LE. Chapter 11: High blood pressure. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed. Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 335-62. Ben-Shlomo Y, Kuh D. A life course approach to chronic disease epidemiology: conceptual models, empirical challenges and interdisciplinary perspectives. International journal of epidemiology. 2002;31(2):285-93. Bishop DB, O’Connor PJ, Desai J. Chapter 10: Diabetes. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 291-334. Brownson RC, Joshu C. Chapter 14: Cancer. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 429-68. Dufour M. Chapter 8: Alcohol use. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 229-68. Galuska DA, Dietz WH. Chapter 9: Obesity and overweight. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 269-90. Henley G, Harrison JE. Trends in injury deaths, Australia: 1999–00 to 2009–10. Injury research and statistics series no. 74. Cat. no. INJCAT 150. . Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; 2015. Hosking J, Ameratunga S, Morton S, Blank D. A life course approach to injury prevention: a. BMC public health. 2011;11(1):695. Husten CG. Chapter 5: Tobacco use. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 117-58. Johnson HM, McBride PE. Chapter 12: High blood cholesterol. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 363-82. Khan KS, Kunz R, Kleijnen J, Antes G. Five steps to conducting a systematic review. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 2003;96(3):118-21. Lynch J, Smith GD. A life course approach to chronic disease epidemiology. Annu Rev Public Health. 2005;26:1-35. Malas N, Tharp KM, Foerster SB. Chapter 6: Diet and nutrition. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 159-98. McDermott RJ, A. BJ, Bryant CA, DeBate RD. Chapter 3: Intervention methods for chronic disease control. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 59-94. Miranda J, Kinra S, Casas J, Davey Smith G, Ebrahim S. Non‐communicable diseases in low‐and middle‐income countries: context, determinants and health policy. Tropical Medicine & International Health. 2008;13(10):1225-34. Moodie R, Stuckler D, Monteiro C, Sheron N, Neal B, Thamarangsi T, et al. Profits and pandemics: prevention of harmful effects of tobacco, alcohol, and ultra-processed food and drink industries. The Lancet. 2013;381(9867):670-9. Newschaffer CJ, Liu L, Sim A. Chapter 13: Cardiovascular disease. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 383-428. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION TWO Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 10 Omran AR. The epidemiologic transition: a theory of the epidemiology of population change. The Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly. 1971:509-38. Pointer S. Trends in hospitalised injury, Australia: 1999–00 to 2012–13. Injury research and statistics series no. 95. Cat. no. INJCAT 171. . Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; 2015. Remington PL, Brownson RC, Savitz D. Chapter 2: Methods in chronic disease epidemiology. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 27-58. Rose G. Strategy of prevention: lessons from cardiovascular disease. British medical journal (Clinical research ed). 1981;282(6279):1847-51. Runyan CW. Introduction: back to the future—revisiting Haddon’s conceptualization of injury epidemiology and prevention. Epidemiologic Reviews. 2003;25(1):60-4. Sanson-Fisher RW, D’Este CA, Carey ML, Noble N, Paul CL. Evaluation of systems-oriented public health interventions: alternative research designs. Annual review of public health. 2014;35:9-27. Wedding D. Chapter 16: Mental disorders. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 513-30. Wegner MV, Rohan A, Remington PL. Chapter 4: Chronic disease surveillance. In: Remington PL, Brownson RC, Wegner MV, editors. Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control 3rd ed Washington: American Public Health Association; 2010. p. 95-116. «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION THREE Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 11 3. Assessment 3.1 Assessment summary There are «Total_Assessments» assessment items in this unit, designed to enable you to demonstrate that you have achieved the unit learning outcomes. Completion and submission of all assessment items which have been designated as mandatory or compulsory is essential to receive a passing grade. Achievement of at least 50% overall is required to pass this unit. «Assessment_requirements» ASSESSMENT DUE DATE WEIGHTING FEEDBACK ITEM TASK MODE DATE 1 Assignment 1 Critical appraisal of NCD aetiology «Due_Date» 20% Online Within 2 weeks 2 Assignment 2 Critical appraisal of NCD interventions «Due_Date2» 20% Online Within 2 weeks 3 Assignment 3 Research protocol design «Due_Date3» 60% Online Within 2 weeks «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION THREE Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 12 3.2 Assessment Details Assessment 1: Critical appraisal of non-communicable disease aetiology (20%) Due Date: 21 March, 2016 Length: Approximately 1,000 words Submission Details: Upload your Assignment in the ‘Assignments’ area of vUWS Feedback Details: Marked assignments with individualised comments will be posted on vUWS Rationale Assignment 1 will ask students to engage with conceptual models associated with the development of non-communicable diseases, and how they relate to the aetiology of a particular non-communicable disease outcome. An understanding of the range of structural and individual factors that affect noncommunicable disease progression over the life-course is important in identifying prevention and control responses.. Task The objective for this assignment is to select a peer-reviewed journal article relating to a noncommunicable disease outcome in order to summarise the putative aetiological mechanism of the outcome, assess the evidence-base for the association, and to consider methodological limitations in the interpretation of the association. Criteria You will be assessed on the following:  The summary of evidence in the selected article  The critical appraisal of the evidence-base in support of the study  The critique of the methodological limitations of the study Rubric for Assessment 1 Please see Assignment 1 documentation for marking rubric Resources Resources, readings and hints will be provided online, during lectures, and in tutorials «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION THREE Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 13 Assessment 2: Critical appraisal of non-communicable disease interventions (20%) Due Date: 18 April, 2016 Length: Approximately 1,000 words Submission Details: Upload your Assignment in the ‘Assignments’ area of vUWS Feedback Details: Marked assignments with individualised comments will be posted on vUWS Rationale Assignment 2 will ask students to engage with interventions to prevent and control non-communicable diseases in populations. An understanding of the effectiveness or otherwise of prevention and control initiatives will inform the development of the research protocol described in Assignment 3. Task The objective for this assignment is to select a peer-reviewed journal article relating to an intervention to prevent a non-communicable disease outcome. Criteria You will be assessed on the following:  The summary of evidence in the selected article  The critical appraisal of the evidence-base in support of the study  The critique of the methodological limitations of the study Rubric for Assessment 1 Please see Assignment 1 documentation for marking rubric Resources Resources, readings and hints will be provided online, during lectures, and in tutorials «UNIT_NUMBERCODE» «UNIT_NAME» «SESSION» «YEAR» SECTION THREE Western Sydney University – Learning Guide 14 Assessment 3: Research protocol design (60%) Due Date: 23 May, 2016 Length: Approximately 4,000 words Submission Details: Upload your Assignment in the ‘Assignments’ area of vUWS Feedback Details: Marked assignments with individualised comments will be posted on vUWS Rationale Assignment 3 will ask students to engage in developing a research protocol to address a noncommunicable disease outcome, and involves synthesising unit material relating to conceptual models of disease aetiology and prevention, and applying information from the evidence-base of noncommunicable disease topics covered in the unit. Task The objective for this assignment is to become competent in designing a research project that addresses a non-communicable disease outcome. The final assignment requires you to build upon the conceptual models of non-communicable disease control and prevention and the specific disease topics covered in the unit to develop a hypothetical research protocol in the format of a grant proposal. This will involve developing a rationale for the study objectives, describing the research plan, and describing the anticipated outcomes. Criteria You will be assessed on the following:  Structure and organisation of the research protocol  The evidence and argument used to develop the project rationale and research plan  The style and format of the research protocol  The use of sources and references in developing the research protocol Rubric for Assessment 3 Please see Assignment 3 documentation for marking rubric Resources Resources, readings and hints will be provided online, during lectures, and in tutorials Western Studen Studen Unit na Tutoria Tutoria Unit Co Title o Length Date d Date s Campu Declarat  I hold  I here stud assig  I here (pre perm  No pa exce conc  I am a prog data Signatur Note: A declarat n Sydney Un nt name: nt number: ame and num al group: al day and ti oordinator: f assignmen h: due: ubmitted: us enrolmen tion: a copy of thi by certify tha dent’s work o gnment. by certify tha evious or curr mission from art of the assi ept where co cerned. aware that th grams for the abase for fut re:_________ An examiner tion has not niversity – Le mber: me: t: t: is assignmen at no part of t r from any ot at no part of t rent) assessm the Lecturer/ gnment/prod llaboration h is work will b e purpose of d ture plagiaris __________ or lecturer/t been signed TH earning Guid Assignm Sch 401174 : Ep Andrew Pa t if the origin this assignme ther source e this assignme ment, except w /Tutor/ Unit duct has bee as been auth be reproduced detecting pos sm checking) ___________ tutor has the d. HIS IS THE EN de ment Cove hool of Medic pidemiology o ge nal is lost or d ent or produc except where ent or produc where appro Co-ordinator n written/pro horised by the d and submit ssible plagiar g). ___________ e right to no ND OF THE LE er Sheet cine of non-comm damaged. ct has been c due acknow ct has been s priately refer r for this unit oduced for m e Lecturer/Tu tted to plagia rism (which m _ t mark this a EARNING GU municable dise copied from a ledgement is ubmitted by renced, and w . me by any oth utor/Unit Coarism detectio may retain a assignment i IDE eases any other s made in the me in anothe with prior her person -ordinator on software copy on its if the above 15 e er

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