Death and Dying Case Study

It is of paramount importance that health practitioners are able to relate with their patients and provide care unbiased providing a sense of comfort, reassurance, relief from emotional and psychological stress that their diagnosis and prognosis has put on them. These cannot be achieved if the healthcare provider does not relate with the patient, understands the strength and weaknesses of the patient and furthermore know the patient’s worldview of spirituality and what religion the patient practice and how strength is drawn.  It is important that providers acknowledge that people have worldview that differs from each other and even different form the provider’s view hence respecting other’s view and faith is very crucial and not allowing personal view or faith to influence the care provided. According to Aldridge 1991, healing and recovery is said to faster when medical and spirituality are both integrated into care through various world view…
Death and Dying Case Study
The practice of health care providers at all levels brings you  into contact with people from a variety of faiths. This calls for  knowledge and acceptance of a diversity of faith expressions. Death and Dying Case Study.
The purpose of this paper is to complete a comparative ethical  analysis of George’s situation and decision from the perspective of two  worldviews or religions: Christianity and a second religion of your  choosing. For the second faith, choose a faith that is unfamiliar to  you. Examples of faiths to choose from include Sikh, Baha’i, Buddhism,  Shintoism, etc.
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In your comparative analysis, address all of the worldview questions  in detail for Christianity and your selected faith. Refer to Chapter 2  of Called to Care for the list of questions. Once you have  outlined the worldview of each religion, begin your ethical analysis  from each perspective. Death and Dying Case Study.
In a minimum of 1,500-2,000 words, provide an ethical analysis based  upon the different belief systems, reinforcing major themes with  insights gained from your research, and answering the following  questions based on the research:

How would each religion interpret the nature of George’s malady and  suffering? Is there a “why” to his disease and suffering? (i.e., is  there a reason for why George is ill, beyond the reality of physical  malady?)
In George’s analysis of his own life, how would each religion think  about the value of his life as a person, and value of his life with ALS? Death and Dying Case Study.
What sorts of values and considerations would each religion focus on  in deliberating about whether or not George should opt for euthanasia?
Given the above, what options would be morally justified under each religion for George and why?
Finally, present and defend your own view. Death and Dying Case Study.

Support your position by referencing at least three academic  resources (preferably from the GCU Library) in addition to the course  readings, lectures, the Bible, and the textbooks for each religion. Each  religion must have a primary source included. A total of six references  are required according to the specifications listed above. Incorporate  the research into your writing in an appropriate, scholarly manner. Death and Dying Case Study.
Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA  Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is  required. Death and Dying Case Study
 
Case Study on Death and Dying
Abstract
Daily as health care provider, coming in contact with patients for different vast of life, ethnicity, race, culture and religion cannot be avoided.  Even as this is unavoidable, so also is the need to have basic knowledge about different religion cannot be underestimate. This paper uses the case study of George to complete a comparative ethical analysis and decision making while considering two religions which are Christianity and Buddhism. Different research articles and journals which use both quantitative and qualitative method were used to gain and gather basic information of the Christianity worldview and Buddhism worldview. Also, how this religion provides answer to basic worldview questions. The view of these religions about sickness and health were also considered.
Introduction
It is of paramount importance that health practitioners are able to relate with their patients and provide care unbiased providing a sense of comfort, reassurance, relief from emotional and psychological stress that their diagnosis and prognosis has put on them. These cannot be achieved if the healthcare provider does not relate with the patient, understands the strength and weaknesses of the patient and furthermore know the patient’s worldview of spirituality and what religion the patient practice and how strength is drawn.  It is important that providers acknowledge that people have worldview that differs from each other and even different form the provider’s view hence respecting other’s view and faith is very crucial and not allowing personal view or faith to influence the care provided. According to Aldridge 1991, healing and recovery is said to faster when medical and spirituality are both integrated into care through various world view. Death and Dying Case Study.
Christian and Buddhism Worldview
“Worldviews provide the cultural lenses that shape how we see the world, and they give meaning to life, both personally and for humanity as a whole” (Shelly, J.A. & Miller, A. B. 2006). The term worldview can also be simply described as the perceptive through which an individual sees at the world and how this personal belief influences the totality of such life. A proper understanding of the concept of worldview can only be achieved through the response provided to the James Sire questions which are: what is prime reality, what is the nature of the world around us, what is a human being, what happens when a person dies or at death, why do we know anything at all, how do we know what is right and what is wrong, and what is the meaning of human history. The responses to these questions varies based on the religion that is been considered
The Christian Worldview
            As stated by Shelly, J.A. & Miller, A. B. (2006), to Christians, God is the prime reality, the creator and sustainer of all things. As it is written in Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth”, likewise Colossians 1:16 proves this; “For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him”.
The act of disobedience of the first creature Adam and Eve to God brought about the fall of man which caused a huge change to the divine order of the good things that were created because God initially said all the things He created were good. God saw all that he had made, and it was very good. Death and Dying Case Study. And there was evening, and there was morning–the sixth day (Genesis 1:31). This singular act of disobedience opened the door for sickness, disease, infirmities, pestilences and even death. But God did not leave man in this state; He orchestrated a means for redemption through the birth and death of Jesus Christ which reconcile man back to God. His death is believed to have brought an end to the era of disease and both physical and spiritual death for those that believe in him. The bible stated in Isaiah 53:4-5 “Surely he hath borne our grieves, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed”.  Though is it is believed that Jesus brought redemption, salvation and reconciliation between man and God but Christians still await the era of restoration which can also be described as the return of Jesus and the final judgment. The Christian worldview believes in the Holy Spirit which teaches and guide a person to distinguish between what is right and wrong and give the ability to do the right at all times. In addition to that, miracles, human dignity and moral standards are parts of Christian worldview. It is also believed that there is life after death and that there are two destinations a person can either go after death which are heaven or hell. Christianity also against suicide and taking other people’s life since life is divine and given by God, it should be treated with respect and dignity and no one has the right to take it.
The Buddhism Worldview
White, B., (1993) described Buddhism as much more of philosophy than it is a religion because it explains a way of life or of being. The writer further summed up the path of a Buddhist as “to lead a moral life; to be mindful and aware of thoughts and actions; and to develop wisdom and understanding” (White, B., 1993, p. 1). Buddhists are known to pay homage to Buddha’s image, a man who taught others from his experience of enlightenment. According to White, B., this image is believed to remind them to love from within and make every effort to develop peace. Buddhists do not believe there is a God that created the whole universe they rather believe and live by the principles of Buddha. The ultimate goal of a Buddhist is to attain a state of Nirvana to be awakened or Enlightened. The Buddhist worldview on healing is that the illness or health is created in the mind. According to Hawter, P., 1995¸ it is believed that problems or illnesses are like clouds that block the sun, they are temporary and can be removed from the mind by eliminating negative thoughts and replacing them with positive thoughts. They also believe in the power of karma which may be positive or negative actions. In Buddhism, four Noble Truths are utilized which are: the truth of suffering (dukkha), life of sorrow; the “Dukkha” translate temporal which means this suffering is temporal. Second Noble Truth is the truth of the cause of suffering (samudaya) which identifies that suffering result from the craving or thirst (tanha) or desire of man which usually result in frustration and heartbreak if these desires are not meant. The third Noble truth is the truth of the end of suffering (nirhodha) which prescribes a cure for the suffering by putting an end to craving through delightful practice. The fourth Noble Truth is the truth of the path that frees us from suffering (magga). Death and Dying Case Study. Here, Buddha prescribes the treatment for illness: The Eightfold Path. These are the core Buddhist moral principles and they include: right view, resolve, speech, conduct, livelihood, effort, mindfulness, and concentration.  In other words, doing everything right.
Case Study Analysis
Christianity is divided into different denominations, based on the denomination George belong to, the illness can either be believed to either be a consequence of sin committed or it just pleases God to bring the sickness on him as a test of faith. To a Buddhists, George sickness can be attributed to his thought and desires because Buddhism believes that suffering are brought upon a man as a result of his crave or desire. Death and Dying Case Study.
As a result of ASL that has suddenly struck George, George is no longer physically fit and is gradually becoming totally dependent on others as the disease progresses. Based on Christianity view, George’s life has deviated from the perfect and good creature God created. Though his life is still so valuable before God, but is body is suffering. A Buddhism value of George’s life would be that suffering is part of life according to the first Noble truth.
Furthermore, though the fear of suffering, pain and being caged in his own body has gripped the heart of George, euthanasia is not an option in Christianity because it is considered unacceptable to God. It is believed in Christianity that helping another person take her or her own life for any reason is still an act of murder. God gave life and nobody has the right to take it.
Likewise, Buddhism does not support euthanasia. According to the philosophy of Buddha, it is a bad karma to either kill oneself or another.
Helping George to a peaceful death will be morally justified by both religions. George will benefit from spiritual care and palliative care as the disease progresses. Both religion values and respect life hence, George should be taught and supported on how to maximally enjoy to the fullest the time he has left.  Since both religions believe in prayer, George can also benefit from this. Death and Dying Case Study.
As a Christian, this writer believes in repentance, forgiveness of sin, prayer and miracle. If the sickness was as a result of a sin committed, George can repent and ask for forgive. The Lord is faithful and just to forgive all sin and brings about healing and restoration. No matter how and the situation of George may be, God can also perform miracle and heal him if He so will. Peradventure the sickness is unto death; George should make use of the time remaining to have a good relationship with God. Make his way right with God and impact people around him for good preparing for life after death, life eternal in Heaven.
Conclusion
Holistic care is a major and central part of nursing care, the part of spirituality cannot be relinquished in achieving this. At the time of sickness, when people who are formally able and agile becomes disabled and totally dependence either physically or emotionally even psychologically, spiritual care has a part to play in the healing progress or transitional process to either health or peaceful death. Death and Dying Case Study. Versatility of healthcare professionals in the knowledge of different religion and worldview is an important to in providing spiritual care. The two religions considered in this paper both have certain things in common which include the value and respect for life and not causing harm. Care should be provided without bias and not been influenced by the provider’s personal view.
 
References
Aldridge, David. (1991). Spirituality, healing and medicine. The British Journal of General Practice, 41(351), 425-427.
Hawter, P. (1995). Healing: A tibetan Buddhist perspective. Retrieved from http://www.buddhanet.net/tib_heal.htm
Lizardi, D., & Gearing, R. (2010). Religion and Suicide: Buddhism, Native American and African Religions, Atheism, and Agnosticism. Journal Of Religion & Health, 49(3), 377-384. doi:10.1007/s10943-009-9248-8
Meilaender, G. (2013). Bioethics: A Primer for Christians. (3rd ed., pp. 21-22). Grand        Rapids,  MI: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co. Retrieved from https://viewer.gcu.edu/UXWB22 Death and Dying Case Study.
Shelly, J. A. & Miller, A.B. (2006). Called to Care: a Christian Worldview for        Nursing. (2nd ed.)       Downer Grove IL: IVP Academic/InterVarsity Press.            Retrieved from https://viewer.gcu.edu
The Holy Bible. KJV,NIV
White, B. (1993). Buddhanet basic Buddhism guide: A five minute introduction. Retrieved          from http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/5minbud.htm Death and Dying Case Study.
 

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