Discussion: Psychiatric Emergencies
Discussion: Psychiatric Emergencies
Discussion: Psychiatric Emergencies
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Briefly describe the case you selected.
Explain how you would treat the client differently if he or she were a child or adolescent.
Explain any legal or ethical issues you would have to consider when working with a child or adolescent emergency case.
Week 6: Emergency Psychiatric Care in Childhood and Adolescence
“I can’t believe I am not dead. I want to be dead, but those pills did not work as fast as I expected. Dad found me and called 911. I cannot go on living after what they said about me on the Internet. My life is ruined and I cannot go back to school or even show my face around here. They all think I am that way, but I am not. Dad thinks this was a mistake, but he is wrong. When I get out of here, I am going to try something different, and this time it will work.”
Jessica, age 13
When psychiatric emergencies arise, they can present many challenges to the PMHNP. While there are many approaches to emergencies that are similar, there are also significant differences when dealing with children and adolescents versus adults. This is particularly true with coordination of care, availability of resources, and legal implications of the psychiatric emergency.
This week, you examine psychiatric emergencies that arise during childhood and adolescence and compare how those emergencies are assessed and treated to those of adult clients.
Learning Resources
Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.
REQUIRED READINGS
Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2014). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry: Behavioral sciences/clinical psychiatry (11th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer.Chapter 23, “Emergency Psychiatric Medicine” (pp. 785–790)
Chapter 31, “Child Psychiatry” (pp. 1226–1253)
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