Emerging Technology Brief Assignment NUR 514

Emerging Technology Brief Assignment

Emerging Technology Brief

New health care innovations offer the advanced registered nurse an opportunity to apply emerging technologies in practice to improve quality and patient outcomes. With the improvement in research and technology, healthcare systems continue to find the best possible ways to enhance care, treatment and diagnosis processes (Le et al., 2018). Today, most of the hospitals and other healthcare institutions realizes productivity through emergence of different technological products. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the emerging technology in the healthcare system. In other words, there is nothing quite exciting as artificial intelligence with all the opportunities surrounding it. To ensure efficiency in the 21st century medicine, it is the best time to utilize artificial intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to discuss Artificial Intelligence as an emerging technology in the healthcare system.

The application of artificial intelligence in the healthcare industry is expected to grow rapidly at the rate of 40% through 2021 to 6.6 $billion from $600 million in the year 2014 (Boenink, Van Lente, & Moors, 2016). AI machines can mitigate and reduce risks of preventable medical situations in different ways. They can identify people at high risks or in critical conditions by discovering patients who are in need of immediate attention and thereafter trigger medical alerts to enhance custom care plans. They can also automate reminders which can enable patients take their medications within the stipulated timeframe.

Emerging Technology Brief Assignment NUR 514

Also, the AI can deliver personalized medical dosage recommendations in line with an individual’s body chemistry as well as the related environmental factors. Currently, there are always some medication errors (Richins, 2015). In other words, the prescribed drugs may not react well with in individual’s immune system, leading to more complications.

Artificial Intelligence machines are programmed to understand patient’s body system as well as the complications associated with it. Unlike the current systems where samples of blood have to be taken for laboratory tests, AI can detect diseases and body complications all at once; it is easy to envisage a unique health care world where there is the use of Artificial Intelligence (IA) that can analyze the patient population and undertake treatment processes (Silva et al., 2015). United States’ hospitals and physicians still exist in the digital dark ages when it comes to the application of the newest computerized devices as well as the internet services to deliver healthcare services.

Artificial Intelligence will mostly function in the healthcare system to reduce the medical errors and quickly deliver medication and treatment processes so as to avoid unnecessary deaths at emergency rooms. The implementation of artificial intelligence in the healthcare system will greatly reduce the number of healthcare workers (Daim et al., 2016). Also, it will require expertise in nursing informatics and computer technicians mainly the programmers and ICT experts. The implementation of AI in the healthcare settings may also come with unethical issues. For instance, there may be lack of consent from the patients to diagnose other diseases which may not be necessary. Also, the system may prescribe overdose and multiple drugs that may interact within the body to reduce efficiency in enhancing immune system.

Artificial Intelligence will improve access to care and promote patient safety and quality in different ways. First, being an automated system. The process of treatment, medication, diagnosis, and surgery will be quick and accurate, a scenario that will reduce crowding of patients in different hospitals. Also, the patients will be able to obtain right diagnosis and accurate medications within the shortest time possible. In other words, the system may be helpful in emergency cases. With the accurately programmed system, patients will be sure of error-free prescription and other medical processes.

Emerging Technology Brief NUR 514

New health care innovations offer the advanced registered nurse an opportunity to apply emerging technologies in practice to improve quality and patient outcomes. For this assignment, research an emerging health care technology that you think has the potential to overcome current or emerging barriers to care.

Write a 500-word brief that provides an overview of the technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology. Discuss how this technology could improve access to care and promote patient safety and quality.

****Refer to the Topic 6 materials for samples and resources to help you construct your brief.*****

You are required to cite three to five sources to complete this assignment. Sources must be published within the last 5 years and appropriate for the assignment criteria and nursing content.

While APA style is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and documentation of sources should be presented using APA formatting guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This Emerging Technology Brief Assignment assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

*******Refer to the Topic 6 materials for samples and resources to help you construct your brief.*******
Let me know if you need the topic 6 materials

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Emerging Technology Brief Assignment – Rubric

The Emerging Technology, Its Purpose, and How it Would Function in a Health Care Setting, Including Any Ethical or Legal Issues That Would Accompany the Incorporation of the Technology
35.0
A discussion of the emerging technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology, is not included.
A discussion of the emerging technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology, is present, but it lacks detail or is incomplete.
A discussion of the emerging technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology, is present.
A discussion of the emerging technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology, is clearly provided and well developed.
A comprehensive discussion of the emerging technology, its purpose, and how it would function in a health care setting, including any ethical or legal issues that would accompany the incorporation of the technology, is thoroughly developed with supporting details.
Required Sources
5.0
Sources are not included.
Number of required sources is only partially met.
Number of required sources is met, but sources are outdated or inappropriate.
Number of required sources is met. Sources are current, but not all sources are appropriate for the assignment criteria and nursing content.
Number of required resources is met. Sources are current, and appropriate for the assignment criteria and nursing content.
How This Technology Improves Access to Care and Promotes Patient Safety and Quality
30.0
A discussion of how this technology improves access to care and promotes patient safety and quality is not included.
A discussion of how this technology improves access to care and promotes patient safety and quality is present, but it lacks detail or is incomplete.
A discussion of how this technology improves access to care and promotes patient safety and quality is present.
A discussion of how this technology improves access to care and promotes patient safety and quality is clearly provided and well developed.
A comprehensive discussion of how this technology improves access to care and promotes patient safety and quality is thoroughly developed with supporting details.
Presentation
10.0
The piece is not neat or organized, and it does not include all required elements.
The work is not neat and includes minor flaws or omissions of required elements.
The overall appearance is general, and major elements are missing.
The overall appearance is generally neat, with a few minor flaws or missing elements.
The work is well presented and includes all required elements. The overall appearance is neat and professional.
Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)
10.0
Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction is employed.
Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied.
Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but they are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed.
Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech.
The writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English.
Documentation of Sources (citations, footnotes, references, bibliography, etc., as appropriate to assignment and style)
10.0
Sources are not documented.
Documentation of sources is inconsistent or incorrect, as appropriate to assignment and style, with numerous formatting errors.
Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, although some formatting errors may be present.
Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is mostly correct.
Sources are completely and correctly documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is free of error.

Emerging Technology Brief

Today, the health care system is characterized by massive breakthroughs in health technologies. These technologies are promising in changing the treatment modalities for many diseases and impacting how health care is delivered. Consequently, the identified emerging health care technology that has the potential to overcome current or emerging barriers to care is electronic health records (EHR).

EHR connotes a digital adaptation of patients’ paper chart. It contains electronic format of a collection of patient health information. EHRs characterizes real-time, patient-oriented records that convey available patient information securely and immediately to the permitted users (Ammenwerth et al., 2017). Although EHRs contain patients’ medical and treatment histories, the system is also designed to provide wider view of patient’s care. Essentially, EHRs play serve critical purpose in health care setting by automating and streamlining the workflow of health care providers, containing diagnoses, medical histories, laboratory and tests results, treatment plans, radiology images, immunization dates, and allergies of a given patient. Finally, they also play a role of allowing accessibility to evidence-based tools that can help care givers to make informed decision about patient care.

The introduction of EHR has ensured significant transformation in health care delivery. To begin with, EHR serves as a crucial tool to manage broad and labor-intensive paperwork health records in a more effective way, which ultimately minimizes the cost of storage, transcription, and re-filling (Peters & Khan, 2014). Besides, since the EHR contains all the patient information, it significantly lowers the chances of occurrences of medical errors and also assists in enhancing the patient health by fostering effective management of the diseases. Moreover, EHR facilitates the process of getting, organizing, scrutinizing, and presenting health data to ease decision making process. EHR also minimizes the risk of health data duplication since it is possible to share files across various health care systems including adjusting and updating them, thus, reducing risk of lost data. Other benefits include facilitation of quality healthcare delivery and increased health care safety (Cowie et al., 2017).

The ethical issues that accompany the incorporation of the EHR include the consideration of the security of health data and also protection of the privacy and confidentiality of the patient information (Heart, Ben-Assuli & Shabtai, 2017). Therefore, the implementation of EHR should consider regulatory standards such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Privacy Rule and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH). These regulations play an important role in protecting the privacy and confidentiality of the health records of the patients and also helping in avoiding the legal liability.

Essentially, EHR can improve access to care by increasing efficiencies in workflow. It does this by lowering the required time in pulling charts, enhancing scheduling of patient appointment, enhancing access to inclusive patient data, allocating remote access to patients’ charts, and assisting in managing the prescription. On the other hand, EHR promotes patient safety and quality by improving health management, enhancing communication and interface among the primary health providers and patients involved in the care, reducing needless patient investigations, and reductions of medical errors.

References

Ammenwerth, E., Lannig, S., Hörbst, A., Muller, G., & Schnell‐Inderst, P. (2017). Adult patient access to electronic health records. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (6).

Cowie, M. R., Blomster, J. I., Curtis, L. H., Duclaux, S., Ford, I., Fritz, F., & Michel, A. (2017). Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research. Clinical Research in Cardiology106(1), 1-9.

Heart, T., Ben-Assuli, O., & Shabtai, I. (2017). A review of PHR, EMR and EHR integration: A more personalized healthcare and public health policy. Health Policy and Technology6(1), 20-25.

Peters, S. G., & Khan, M. A. (2014). Electronic health records: Current and future use. Journal of comparative effectiveness research3(5), 515-522.

Topic 6 DQ 1

In what ways can informatics help health care providers overcome current or emerging barriers to care and increase access to safe, quality health care? Include a discussion of the value and challenges of clinical provider order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in providing safe patient care in your response.

Re: Topic 6 DQ 1
McGonigle & Mastrian (2018) states informatics is “A field that integrates a specialty’s science, computer science, cognitive science, and information science to manage and communicate data, information, knowledge, and wisdom in a specialty’s practice.” (p. 568) Information technology (IT) can greatly improve the safety and quality of care delivered to patients when it does what the user intends for it to do, the user interface is created in a way that is easy to understand and use, and the is appropriate for the environment it is being used in. Traditionally delivery of healthcare services required an in-person interaction between patients and healthcare providers. One way informatics has helped address barriers to care is by bringing healthcare services to the patient. The COVID pandemic highlighted the need to continue delivery of healthcare services, even when it was not possible to have an in-person interaction between clinical providers and patients. Though telehealth services were available prior to COVID, the pandemic moved telehealth from simply being a useful alternative to it becoming a critical means for continued access to quality healthcare services that did compromising the safety of patients or healthcare professionals. “Telehealth allows nurses to use telecommunication and videoconferencing software to communicate more effectively and more frequently with patients at home by using the technology to monitor patients’ vital signs, supervise their wound care, or demonstrate a procedure.” (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018, p. 209) At the height of the pandemic patients were triaged from home and given direction regarding what level of care services were needed. Triaging patients is accomplished more efficiently using clinical support decision support systems (CDSS). The CDSS is “A computer-based program designed to assist clinicians in making clinical decisions by filtering or integrating vast amounts of information and providing suggestions for clinical intervention.” (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018, p. 559) The CDSS promotes safety by making evidence-based information uniformly and readily available to nurses. Another informatics tool that improves quality and patient safety is the computerized provider order entry system (CPOE). Taieb-Maimon et al. (2018) states “CPOE systems are computer-based systems that allow a physician or other ordering authority (nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, etc.) to directly enter orders for medications, tests, or other medical procedures, for a specific patient.” (p. 383) The CPOE is programmed to alert providers to erroneous, unsafe, or incomplete information and provides decision support to clinicians. The electronic format of the CPOE minimizes the potential for misinterpretation of order information due to issues with legibility, thus increasing patient safety. (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018)

When informatics does not produce the intended results or the user interface is not functional, technology can create barriers to care and decrease the quality and or safety of care delivered. At a minimum, when information and technology are inappropriately or ineffectively utilized the effort may result in wasted resources. As many as 75% of physicians do not verify patient information after selecting when writing orders and that improved user interface design can help mitigate the problem. (Taieb-Maimon et al., 2018) The user interface should be developed specifically with the needs of the end user in mind. Gaining insight from users to understand how the technology will be used is critical to ensuring the user interface is developed appropriately. When a user interface does not adequately address the needs of the end user or account for the level of risk inherent to the functions being performed by the user, technology can produce or facilitate new errors that compromise patient safety.

References

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Jones & Barnett Learning. nursing_informatics_and_the_foundation_of_knowledge_4e | WebViewer (gcu.edu)

Taieb-Maimon, M., Plaisant, C., Hettinger, A. Z., & Shneiderman, B. (2018). Increasing Recognition of Wrong-Patient Errors through Improved Interface Design of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, 34(5), 383–398. https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1080/10447318.2017.1349249

Topic 6 DQ 2

Differentiate between EMRs and EHRs. Discuss the importance of interoperability in relationship to both types of records and to how the EMR and EHR improve quality and access to care.

Re: Topic 6 DQ 2
Both an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and Electronic Health Record (EHR) are digital records of patient health information. An EMR is best understood as a digital version of a patient’s chart, while an EHR contains the patient’s records from multiple doctors and provides a more holistic, long-term view of a patient’s health. Both EHRs and EMRs offer benefits to patients and healthcare providers such as; reduced medical errors improved health care, patient charts are more complete and clear, information sharing can reduce duplicate testing, saving patients and providers time, money and trouble, improved information access makes prescribing medication safer and more reliable, the promotion of patient participation can encourage healthier lifestyles and more frequent use of preventative care, and with more complete information means more accurate diagnoses (Practice Fusion, 2019).

The primary benefit is the collaborative nature of an EHR. They are designed to be shared with other healthcare providers and to aid the level of care provided across the care continuum. EHRs also present the ability to track additional information inclusive of demographic data, lab results, insurance information, prior authorizations and data from personal wellness devices from across the internet, enhancing patient access to care.

EHRs also played a significant role in the rollout of Meaningful Use, the Medicare/Medicaid program that mandates the use of EHR to improve patient outcomes and subsequently performance-based compensation. An HER, that is certified technology, meets meaningful use standards for incentive-based programs administered by the CMS (Practice Fusion, 2019). EMRs do not. EHRs are designed to be shared and expanded upon outside of a single practice, where EMRs are not. EMRs are restricted in scope to primarily diagnosis and treatment information. EHRs provide in-depth data across a patient’s medical history from a variety of sources. EHRs move with the patient across providers, states and even country borders. EMRs do not travel with patients easily. The ability to share information across organizations, or interoperability, is vital for organizations to meet requirements of the HITECH Act (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018. P. 185). Electronics records are expected to make healthcare more efficient and less costly and have a possibility to reduce the number of medical errors and therefore increase the safety of the patients.

The Health Insurance Portability and Patient Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA), requires that all protected health information be secure. Keeping health information safe is a major challenge for all members of the healthcare team. EHRs improve accountability with audit trails and security that detail who has accessed the medical records and when and what the individuals did while accessing each record. EHRs also keep information safe from anyone who does not have permission to see patient data. However, patients have access to their own EHRs through patient portals and can read, print and send their health information to providers, empowering patients to be their own advocate (Hoover, 2017).

References

Hoover, R. (2017). Benefits of using an electronic health record, Nursing Critical Care, (12), 1, 9-10. Retrieved from https://doi: 10.1097/01.CCN.0000508631.93151.8d

McGonigle, D., and Mastrian, K. (2018). Administrative Information Systems, in Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge. (4th Ed).

Practice Fusion. (2019). EHR (electronic health record) vs. EMR (electronic medical record). Retrieved May 27, 2021 from: https://www.practicefusion.com/blog/ehr-vs-emr/

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