NURS 6521: Advanced Pharmacology Assignment: Pharmacotherapy for Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Disorders

Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Disorders

Hepatitis C is one of the main sources of cirrhosis and builds the danger of wellbeing difficulties, particularly when there is liver irritation. Before interceding, there is a need to comprehend the patient’s clinical history since it may impact measures to improve the patient’s prosperity (Rosenthal & Burchum, 2020). For example, prednisone smothers the immune system, and there is a need to comprehend why the patient is utilizing the intercession. The clinical history likewise extends to the period when the side effects have happened and Hepatitis.

Primary Diagnosis

            Although a comprehensive history and physical assessment, a diagnostic workup is expected to concoct a primary diagnostic; in light of the introducing symptoms, I will give a primary finding of intense gastroenteritis (Chalasani, Younossi, & Lavine, 2018). The cause is that the stomach and intestinal system are frequently triggered by the virus and bacterial disturbances/aggravation of foods sullied with viruses and parasites. Squeezing, nausea, groaning, or running can have symptoms. Most of the disease efficiently spread from contact with a weakened person or consumes, and drinks of sullied food or foods often spread the disease (Arcangel & Peterson, 2017). The signs typically occur one to three days after pollution. Because the patient is sick, loose, and thick bowels and does not have a fever, I would end up with severe bacterial gastroenteritis.

Differential Diagnosis

            In the context of the history of the patient’s drug abuse, I will be speaking of a specific assessment of hepatitis C severity in the use of IV medicines and of adding indications. Hepatitis C is a serious hepatitis disease caused by hepatitis C infection. It usually results from harming blood or bodily fluid, sex, or needle exchange, which may be severe unclear stomach torment, and often diarrhea, individually or separately. It may be caused by the use of illicit drugs or drugs (Rosenthal & Burchum, 2020)Intense hepatitis C causes diarrhea. Though this underlying infection is most unlikely to cause signs, about 21-30 % of people show indicators approximately 1 to 3 months after the infection has occurred.

Drug Therapy and Treatment Plan

            The primary goal of treatment is lessening the indications and the avoidance of complications. Because the patient is vomiting, dehydration and diarrhea, either 0.8 percent of intravenous liquid hydration will lead to the depletion of fluid from and runs and will avoid further dehydration (Chalasani, Younossi, & Lavine, 2018). I advise the patient to drink clear beverages and stock to support the lack of supplants and electrolytes as nausea subsides. On the other hand, if it is bacterial contamination, I will proceed with IV liquid and an anti-infection like an expansive range anti-toxin like Ciprofloxacin.

 

 

References

Arcangel, V. P., & Peterson, A. M. (2017). Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice: A Practical Approach. Wolters Kluwer.

Chalasani, N., Younossi, Z., & Lavine, J. E. (2018). The Diagnosis and Management of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Practice Guidance From the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Hepatology, 328-357.

Rosenthal, L., & Burchum, J. (2020). Lehne’s Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants. Elsevier – Health Sciences Division.

 

Assignment: Pharmacotherapy for Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Disorders

 

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Gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary disorders affect the structure and function of the GI tract. Many of these disorders often have similar symptoms, such as abdominal pain, cramping, constipation, nausea, bloating, and fatigue. Since multiple disorders can be tied to the same symptoms, it is important for advanced practice nurses to carefully evaluate patients and prescribe a treatment that targets the cause rather than the symptom.

Once the underlying cause is identified, an appropriate drug therapy plan can be recommended based on medical history and individual patient factors. In this Assignment, you examine a case study of a patient who presents with symptoms of a possible GI/hepatobiliary disorder, and you design an appropriate drug therapy plan.

To Prepare
  • Review the case study assigned by your Instructor for this Assignment
  • Reflect on the patient’s symptoms, medical history, and drugs currently prescribed.
  • Think about a possible diagnosis for the patient. Consider whether the patient has a disorder related to the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary system or whether the symptoms are the result of a disorder from another system or other factors, such as pregnancy, drugs, or a psychological disorder.
  • Consider an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
By Day 7 of Week 4

Write a 1-page paper that addresses the following:

  • Explain your diagnosis for the patient, including your rationale for the diagnosis.
  • Describe an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
  • Justify why you would recommend this drug therapy plan for this patient. Be specific and provide examples.

Reminder: The College of Nursing requires that all papers submitted include a title page, introduction, summary, and references. The Sample Paper provided at the Walden Writing Center offers an example of those required elements (available at http://writingcenter.waldenu.edu/57.htm). All papers submitted must use this formatting.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

  • Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
  • Click the Week 4 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
  • Click the Week 4 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
  • Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
  • If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
  • Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Explain your diagnosis for the patient, including your rationale for the diagnosis.
23 (23%) – 25 (25%)
The response accurately and clearly explains in detail the diagnosis for the patient, including an accurate and thorough rationale for the diagnosis that supports clinical judgment.
20 (20%) – 22 (22%)
The response provides a basic explanation of 1-2 diagnoses for the patient, including an accurate rationale for the diagnosis that may support clinical judgment.
18 (18%) – 19 (19%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely explains the diagnosis for the patient, including an inaccurate or vague rationale for the diagnosis that may or may not support clinical judgment.
(0%) – 17 (17%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely explains the diagnosis for the patient, including an inaccurate and vague rationale for the diagnosis that does not support clinical judgment, or is missing.
Describe an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
27 (27%) – 30 (30%)
The response accurately and completely describes in detail an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
24 (24%) – 26 (26%)
The response describes a basic explanation of the appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
21 (21%) – 23 (23%)
The response inaccurately or vaguely describes an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
(0%) – 20 (20%)
The response inaccurately and vaguely describes an appropriate drug therapy plan based on the patient’s history, diagnosis, and drugs currently prescribed.
Justify why you would recommend this drug therapy plan for this patient. Be specific and provide examples.
27 (27%) – 30 (30%)
The response provides an accurate, clear, and detailed justification for the recommended drug therapy plan for this patient. 

The response includes specific, accurate, and detailed examples that fully support the justification provided.

24 (24%) – 26 (26%)
The response provides a basic justification for the recommended drug therapy plan for this patient. 

The response includes only 1-2 examples that fully support the justification provided.

21 (21%) – 23 (23%)
The response provides an inaccurate or vague justification for the recommended drug therapy plan for this patient. 

The response may include examples, which may inaccurately or vaguely support the justification provided.

(0%) – 20 (20%)
The response provides an inaccurate and vague justification for the recommended drug therapy plan for this patient, or is missing. 

The response does not include examples that support the justification provided, or is missing.

Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:
Paragraphs make clear points that support well developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused–neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance.
(5%) – 5 (5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
(4%) – 4 (4%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%–79% of the time.
(0%) – 3 (3%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity less than 60% of the time.
Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:
Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation
(5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors
(4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors
(0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding
Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, running head, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.
(5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct APA format with no errors
(4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1–2) APA format errors
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3–4) APA format errors
(0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors
Total Points: 100

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