what actions would you take to help identify her underlying problem before calling the health care provider?

“While you are waiting for laboratory results,

what therapeutic measures do you

consider?”

~ It may be that P.T. is having actual, preterm, back labor. Her fetus may be in a posterior presentation, thus explaining the lower back pain and the cramping.

~ It may also be back pain and frequency of urination related to the typical bodily changed associated with pregnancy.

P.T.’s history reveals that she had 1 preterm delivery 4 years ago at 31 weeks’ gestation. The infant girl was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for 3 weeks and discharged without sequelae. The second preterm infant, a boy, was delivered 2 years ago at 35 weeks’ gestation and spent 4 days in the hospital before discharge. She has no other risk factors for preterm labor. Vital signs (VS) are normal. Her vaginal examination was essentially within normal limits (WNL); cervix long, closed, and thick; membranes intact. Abdominal examination revealed the abdomen was nontender, with fundal height at 29 cm, fetus in a vertex presentation.

“What actions would you take to help identify her underlying problem before calling the health care provider?”

“Two hours later the laboratory results indicate

a UTI. The contraction monitor indicates only occasional mild contractions. Her physician discharges her to home on an antibiotic for the

UTI.”

Risk for Braxton Hicks

contractions R/T occasional

uterine cramping AEB patient’s

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