Read American Yawp, Chapters 16, 18, 20; and read about Irene McCoy Gaines, and Amadeo P. Giannini.
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Main theme: Beginning around 1880, a new group of migrants reached the U.S—members of this group began their voyages in Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and in Southern and Eastern Europe. Americans living in the south also began another migration, this one to northern cities. African Americans residing in the South were among the poorest Americans, and they enjoyed few of the protections of law and courts. For most European and African Americans, adult life consisted of mastering the problem of finding work. Those migrants, wherever their journeys began, lived their material, emotional, political, and social lives just as we do–by “raising” families, “getting” a living, buying and selling property, and migrating. Here’s an additional idea to consider: Migrants did not seek some “American Dream.” Instead, a way of life (wherever they resided) was coming to an end—and they departed in search of jobs and modest, secure lives for themselves and loved ones.
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We want to study the people who departed Africa, Europe, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean/and Pacific Islands, and the Indian subcontinent. Please remember that migration has also included the movement of people within the U.S. from one place to another—from farms to cities to suburbs, from south to north and maybe back south, and among African American, Latin peoples, and low-income whites a lengthy and hazardous trek toward an uncertain future.
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As one way to start to think about migrants, ask yourself, where did your parents and grandparents (and those before them, if possible) live and work, and why did they relocate to the U.S. and to Florida? From time to time, I acquire pieces of information regarding my grandparents (mother’s side), who resided in Romania c. 1880—and they were in turn part of a migration from a small town to the U.S., Israel, and Australia c. 1900-1910). We have two daughters, both married—one husband’s family moved from Ireland to the US after World War II; and our other son-in-law’s family moved from Lithuania to South Africa (c. 1900) and then to the U.S. in the mid-1970s.
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750 Word Essay Theme: Limited chances for upward mobility for American immigrants. Based on American Yawp, Lectures, and Videos No other sources permitted; and Essay must include all sources. (Papers will be processed through Turnitin)
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What were the factors that shaped the lives of A.P. Giannini and Irene Gaines? What were the chances for European American men and African American women to alter their physical and social circumstances, within the historical contexts in which they resided?
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Grades: A=Giannini and Gaines are prominently featured in your essay; you explain how race/gender/economy/industry/migration limited/enhanced their opportunities. Footnotes to American Yawp and two videos at the bottom. Clearly written, no/few spelling errors; double spaced; name and paper title on p. 1, top.
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B. Giannini and Gaines are featured, but less prominently. Connections to race/gender/economy/industry/migration, etc. are less clearly stated. Footnotes not in correct order; a few spelling errors, single space, name/paper title not clear/missing.
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C. Giannini and Gaines are not visible in the essay. Descriptions of the era’s race/gender/industry/migration are unclear. Other elements listed in A and B missing.

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